Actresses

Actresses

A woman who acts in stage plays, motion pictures, television broadcasts, etc., especially professionally.
Source taken from dictionary.reference.com

Bollywood Industry

Bollywood is the sobriquet for the Hindi language film industry, based in Mumbai, India. The term is often incorrectly used as synecdoche to refer to the whole of Indian cinema; however, it is only a part of the large Indian film industry, which includes other production centres producing films in many languages. Bollywood is one of the largest film producers in India and one of the largest centres of film production in the world. It is more formally referred to as Hindi cinema.

Bollywood film music is called filmi music (from Hindi, meaning “of films”). Songs from Bollywood movies are generally pre-recorded by professional playback singers, with the actors then lip synching the words to the song on-screen, often while dancing. While most actors, especially today, are excellent dancers, few are also singers. One notable exception was Kishore Kumar, who starred in several major films in the 1950s while also having a stellar career as a playback singer. K. L. Saigal, Suraiyya, and Noor Jehan were also known as both singers and actors. Some actors in the last thirty years have sung one or more songs themselves; for a list, see Singing actors and actresses in Indian cinema.

Playback singers are prominently featured in the opening credits and have their own fans who will go to an otherwise lackluster movie just to hear their favourites. Going by the quality as well as the quantity of the songs they rendered, most notable singers of Bollywood are Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle, Geeta Dutt, Shamshad Begum, Kavita Krishnamurthy, Sadhana Sargam and Alka Yagnik among female playback singers; and K. L. Saigal, Talat Mahmood, Mukesh, Mohammed Rafi, Manna Dey, Hemant Kumar, Kishore Kumar, Kumar Sanu, Udit Narayan and Sonu Nigam among male playback singers. Kishore Kumar and Mohammed Rafi are often considered arguably the finest of the singers that have lent their voice to Bollywood songs, followed by Lata Mangeshkar, who, through the course of a career spanning over six decades, has recorded thousands of songs for Indian movies. The composers of film music, known as music directors, are also well-known. Their songs can make or break a film and usually do. Remixing of film songs with modern beats and rhythms is a common occurrence today, and producers may even release remixed versions of some of their films’ songs along with the films’ regular soundtrack albums.

The dancing in Bollywood films, especially older ones, is primarily modelled on Indian dance: classical dance styles, dances of historic northern Indian courtesans (tawaif), or folk dances. In modern films, Indian dance elements often blend with Western dance styles (as seen on MTV or in Broadway musicals), though it is usual to see Western pop and pure classical dance numbers side by side in the same film. The hero or heroine will often perform with a troupe of supporting dancers. Many song-and-dance routines in Indian films feature unrealistically instantaneous shifts of location or changes of costume between verses of a song. If the hero and heroine dance and sing a duet, it is often staged in beautiful natural surroundings or architecturally grand settings. This staging is referred to as a “picturisation”.
Songs typically comment on the action taking place in the movie, in several ways. Sometimes, a song is worked into the plot, so that a character has a reason to sing. Other times, a song is an externalisation of a character’s thoughts, or presages an event that has not occurred yet in the plot of the movie. In this case, the event is often two characters falling in love. The songs are also often referred to as a “dream sequence”, and anything can happen that would not normally happen in the real world.

Previously song and dance scenes often used to be shot in Kashmir, but due to political unrest in Kashmir since the end of the 1980s, those scenes have since then often been shot in Western Europe, particularly in Switzerland and Austria.

Bollywood films have always used what are now called “item numbers”. A physically attractive female character (the “item girl”), often completely unrelated to the main cast and plot of the film, performs a catchy song and dance number in the film. In older films, the “item number” may be performed by a courtesan (tawaif) dancing for a rich client or as part of a cabaret show. The actress Helen was famous for her cabaret numbers. In modern films, item numbers may be inserted as discotheque sequences, dancing at celebrations, or as stage shows.

Hollywood Industry

Hollywood  is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. It is notable for its place as the home of the entertainment industry, including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a metonym for the motion picture industry of the United States. Hollywood is also a highly ethnically diverse, densely populated, economically diverse neighborhood and retail business district.

Hollywood was a small community in 1870 and was incorporated as a municipality in 1903.[1][2] It officially merged with the city of Los Angeles in 1910, and soon thereafter a prominent film industry began to emerge, eventually becoming the most dominant and recognizable in the world.

Lollywood Industry

Lollywood (Urdu: ???? ???) is Pakistani film industry based in the city of Lahore. The word “Lollywood” was first coined in the summer of 1989 in the now-defunct magazine Glamour published from Karachi by a gossip columnist Saleem Nasir, in line with the American film industry’s nickname Hollywood. The film industry in Lahore consists largely of Urdu and Punjabi language films as those languages are the lingua franca of the city.

The film industry in Lahore started in 1929 with the opening of the United Players’ Studios on Ravi Road. The cornerstone for the studio was set by Abdur Rashid Kardar, famous as A R Kardar (Pronounce: kaar’daar). Since then the studio has managed indigenous productions competing with other film production centres in the undivided India, namely Mumbai and Kolkata.

 

Largest markets by box office

World $36.4 2014
1 United States United States
Canada Canada
$10.4 2014
2  China $4.8 2014 55% (2014)
3  Japan $2.0 2014 58.3% (2014)
4  France $1.8 2014 33.3% (2013)
5  United Kingdom $1.7 2014 22.2% (2013)
6  India $1.7 2014
7  South Korea $1.6 2014 48.0% (2014)
8  Germany $1.3 2014
9  Russia $1.2 2014 18% (2013)
10  Australia $1.0 2014
11  Mexico $0.9 2014
12  Brazil $0.8 2014
13  Italy $0.8 2014
14  Spain $0.7 2014
15  Netherlands $0.3 2014

Content taken from Wikipedia.com